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Citing Resources - MLA Style

CITATION GUIDE FOR WORKS CITED - MLA Style


The Modern Languages Association (MLA) 
Citation Guide is used for all Humanities 
(i.e. English, Socials and Modern Languages) assignments at Templeton Secondary.

For Psychology, Science and Home Economics assignments refer to the APA Style Guides.

  • ​​MLA guides may vary depending on the 
    post-secondary institution. 
  • The examples below are formatted using the MLA 8th edition.
  • ​​A copy of The MLA Handbook 8th edition,
    can be found in our library (REF 808 MLA).
  • Always ask your instructor to make sure you
    are using the correct format.
Other trusted MLA citation guides include:

​    The WORKS CITED page is a list of
   all 
sources of information used when
   preparing a
n assignment. ​
   These sources may include print or digital
   versions of encyclopedia articles, books,
   magazines, newspaper articles, non-print
   materials (i.e. films, personal interviews,
   etc.) as well as Databases and Web
   resources.

 
Prior to submitting your work, please use this checklist to review your citations.
 








TEMPLATE FOR GATHERING CITATION INFORMATION
(from page 129 of The MLA HANDBOOK, 8th edition)



TEMPLETON CITATION GUIDE
All citations below are formatted according to the MLA 8th version.​ 

GENERAL RULES FOR PRESENTATION:

1.  The "Works Cited" page is always on a separate piece of paper, at the end of your assignment.
     Always include the title, "Works Cited" at the top of the
page - centered, not bolded, nor underlined.

2.  Everything on the page is double-spaced - both the information in the citations and in between the citations.
 
3.  Arrange citations ALPHABETICALLY by whatever appears first (i.e. author, title of article or book). 
     Ignore the words "A", "An", "The", "Le", "La", "L'" or "Les" when they appear at the beginning of the entry.
 
4.  DO NOT NUMBER the entries. DO NOT use sub-headings, categories for resource types.
 
5.  Citations for resources should be complete, and include all the necessary details (i.e. author, title,
     publisher, date of publication, etc.).  Use the ​Practice Template​ (as seen in the MLA Handbook) to assist in
     gathering the information.
  

6.   Date of Publication is  always the most recent / current date. 

7.   Format for Dates:  ​dd Month* year      Example:    23 Apr. 2018
      *Months are abbreviated (i.e. Jan. / Feb. / Mar. / Apr. / May / Jun. / Jul. / Aug. / Sept. / Oct. / Nov. / Dec.).

8.  PUNCTUATION MATTERS!!  Follow the samples. Exact placement of each comma, period, & colon is important!
 
9.  THE HANGING INDENT:  
     The first line of each citation begins at the margin & subsequent lines are indented five spaces, 
     as in the example below.
 
     Cope, Peter.  The PhotoShop User's Encyclopedia: Every PhotoShop Term You're Ever Likely to Need or Use.  

              Friedman and Fairfax Press, 2002.
  
            
10.  Capitalize all words in the title of a resourceexcept forarticles (a / an / the); prepositions (in / on / of / for, etc.); 
       and conjunctions (and / but / for / so, etc.) when they appear in the middle of the title.    
       Only capitalize these when they are at the beginning of a title.​

11.  ABBREVIATIONS:  See the MLA handbook for the full complement of options.
       Below are the most commonly used abbreviations.
    
Missing Information?
Use these abbreviations                   
   et al.  = and others (Used when there more than 2 authors)  ed.= edition            tr. = translator​
   Monthly Abbreviations:  See #7 above. vol. = volume          no. = number​

​            p. = page                pp. = pages

 
CITATION SAMPLES  
Note:  ​
Sub-headings are used below to show the format for the different resources.   In a proper works cited page ​the resources are listed in alphabetical order, by whatever appears first in the entry. 
DO NOT SEPARATE RESOURCE BY TYPE.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 AN ENCYCLOPEDIA or DICTI​ONARY ARTICLE or ALMANAC
Author's Last Name, First Name . “Title of Article .​Title of the Resource. 
 
 
        Publisher , Date of Publication.  
 

Examples:
 
Deitrich, Walter. "Nuclear Energy."   The World Book Encyclopedia. World Book, 1995. 
 
“Hockey.”  The Canadian Encyclopedia.  Hurtig, 1988.
  
"Cloning." Webster's Third New International Dictionary. Merriam-Webster, 1986.  
 
"Endangered Species." ​The World Book Almanac and Book of Facts. ​World Almanac, 
  
         2009, p188
 Note:

When information in the resource is arranged in alphabetical order, the volume & page number are not required.  (See example 1 above.)

Volume and page numbers are only required when the resource is not arranged in alphabetical order.  (See fourth example 4 above.)

No Author? Begin with the title for the article. (See example 2 above.)




 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  

 


 A BOOK WITH AN AUTHOR

Author’s last name ,  Author’s first name​Book Title. Publisher , Date of Publication.
  
Examples:
 
Lennon, Paul. The Keyboard Player's Chord Bible.  Chartwell Books, 2008. 
 
Trager, James.  The Food Chronology.  University Press, 1995. 

Wilson, Ryder.  ​The Book of House and Garden Plants for West Coast Climates.   Hyperion
        
       Press, 2010.
 

Note:  In the last sample above, the information does not fit on one line.
The 2nd line of the entry must be indented a minimum of 5 spaces / characters.

 
 
 
 
 
A BOOK WITH TWO AUTHORS
Last Name of 1st author, First Name of author and the 2nd author’s First Name and

        Last 
Name.  ​Title of the book .  Publisher , Date of Publication . 
 
Examples:
 
Adams, Norman and Joe Singer. Drawing Jungle Animals.  Watson-Guptill, 1979.
        
Baines, Jacob and John Malek.  ​Atlas of Ancient Egypt.  Facts on File, 1982.
 
Note:  When information does not fit on one line, remember to indent the 2nd line of the entry,
           a minimum
of 5 spaces / characters.
   
 
 
  


A BOOK WITH MORE THAN TWO AUTHORS

Last Name of 1st author, First Name et al.   ​Title of the Book.  Publisher , Date of 

        Publication.
 
Examples:

Allaby, Michael et al.  The Illustrated Dictionary of Science. Facts on File, 1995.

Eisl, Markus et al.  Water: Exploring the Blue Planet.  Firefly Books, 2010.

  
Note:  The abbreviation et al. replaces the names of the other authors.
 
 
 
 

A WORK FROM AN ANTHOLOGY
(For citing poems, short stories, essays, etc)

Author’s or Poet’s Last Name, First Name. “Title of the work.”  Title of the Anthology,

          Editor's Name (if available), Publisher , Date of Publication, page 

          number(s).
 
Examples:

Saki. “The Music on the Hill. ”  The Complete Works of Saki,  The Bodley Head,  

         1989, pp. 161-166. 

Wilde, Oscar. "The Picture of Dorian Gray."  ​Complete Works of Oscar Wilde, edited by Merlin 

          Holland, Harper Collins, 2003, pp. 18 - 159.

Wordsworth, William. “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud.” Major English Romantic Poets,

         Washington Square Press, 1963, p. 194. 

  

 A BOOK WITH EDITOR(S) OR NO AUTHOR

 
 Title of the Book.  Publisher ,  Date of Publication .
 
Examples:

The Art of the Italian Renaissance: architecture, sculpture, painting, drawing.  Konemann, 1995.  
  
​The Penguin Book of First World War Prose.   ​Viking Press, 1989.

 
Note:  When you put this type of entry in order alphabetically, arrange it by keyword, not the article “the”.
 
 
  

MAGAZINE & NEWSPAPER ARTICLES 

  

ARTICLES IN PRINT:

Author’s Last Name, First Name. “Title of article.”  Title of the Magazine, volume

           number,  issue number,  Date of Magazine, page number(s). 
 
Examples:

“400,000 Names on Petition,”  The Province, 13 May 2010, p. A6. 
 
"Mountain Transformed: Thirty Years after the Blast.”  National Geographic,  May 2010,

          pp. 37 - 53. 
 
Zarychanski, Ryan and Donald Houston.  “Anemia of Chronic Disease.”  ​CMAJ: Canadian

          Medical Association Journal, vol. 179, no. 4, 12 Aug. 2008, pp. 333 – 335. 
  

Notes: 

  • ​When no author is mentioned begin with the title of the article.
    (See 1st and 2nd example above.)
  • Provide Volume and Issue numbers only if they are available.
  • If other contributors (i.e. photographers, illustrators, etc.) are mentioned, include this information after the Magazine Title. (See 2nd example in Articles Online section below.)
  • When citing an online periodical it is not necessary to write down the Access Date because the information cannot be altered.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


ARTICLES ONLINE:

Author’s Last Name, First Name. “Title of article.”  Title of the Magazine, Volume #,

           Issue # ,  Date of Magazine, URL or DOI number.

DOI number is a Digital Object Identifier, an alpha-numeric number that is unique to a document online.  ​
  • Whenever possible use the DOI in your citation, rather than the URL.   
  • Always precede the DOI number with doi:






Petrou, Michael.  “Living in Terror.” Maclean's17 May 2010, 

            https://archive.macleans.ca/issue/20100531.

Weiss, Kenneth. "Drying Lakes."  National Geographic, photographed by Mauricio Lima, vol. 233,

            no. 3, Mar. 2018,  https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/03/drying-lakes-

            climate-change-global-warming-drought/.​


ARTICLES FROM DATABASES:

Author’s Last Name, First Name. “Title of article.”  Title of the Magazine, Date of
   
        Magazine. Database, URL or DOI number.

Haeberlein, Samantha.  "Why This Scientist Is Hopeful A Cure to Alzheimer's Disease Isn't Far 

         Off."  ​Time, 15 Jan. 2018. Global Issues in Context,  

         http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/A521305507/GIC?u=39sbo&xid=6caafc0e​.

or

Haeberlein, Samantha.  "Why This Scientist Is Hopeful A Cure to Alzheimer's Disease Isn't Far 

  ​       Off."  ​Time, 15 Jan. 2018.  Global Issues in Context,  ​doi: 10:A521305507.



 ​INTERNET SOURCES / WEB SITES

Author’s Last Name, First Name. “Title of the Article or Individual Page."  ​Title of the

      Website, Name of the Publisher, Date of Publication, URL. Accessed + Date
.


Examples:

 “Afghanistan.” The World Factbook, Central Intelligence Agency,  2018,

          www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/af.html.  Accessed
 
          15 Feb. 2018.
 
Bombino, Giovanna. “History of Kitsilano.” Kitsilano Library Archives, Kitsilano Secondary

         School, 10 Jun. 2005, www.kitsilano.vsb.bc.ca/library/archives/.  Accessed
 
         18 Mar. 2017. 

Notes:​​
  • ​​No Author?  Begin with the title of the web page used. (See first example.) 
  • Use a hanging indent if you need to continue on the next line.​
  • URLs - omit the http:// & truncate address if necessary.
    Always break the URL after a slash (/)
  • Access Date is the last thing listed in a citation.  The word "Accessed" precedes the date.  
  • Date is presented as:   dd Month Year    Example: 05 Aug. 2018.​
    Check the Abbreviations list (#7 in General Information above) for correct format for the months.​
 
  ​

NON-PRINT SOURCES  [Film / DVD / Video / Recordings, etc.]

Last name, First name of the creator.  ​Title of the film or video.  Role of the other 

           contributors and ​their First name Last name, Version, Numbers, Publisher,

          Publication Date.

An Inconvenient Truth.  Paramount Classics, 2006.

​Nye, Bill.  Earthquakes.  Disney, 2014.

The Little Mermaid. Directed by Ron Clements and John Musker, Walt Disney Pictures,
           
                 17 Nov. 1989.​

Note:  When you put this type of entry in order alphabetically, arrange it by keyword, not the article “the”.
           It does not matter if you viewed a DVD, Film, or Online version of the production.
 
 
 

DATABASE RESOURCES 

​[World Book, Canada in Context, Consumer Health Complete, etc.]

Author's Last name, First name.  "Title of the source."  ​Title of the first container (i.e. the 

         original source), First Name and Last Name of any contributors, Version, Numbers, 
 
         Publisher, Publication Date, Location.  Name of Database, URL or DOI.

EXAMPLES:

"Alexander Mackenzie." UXL Biographies, UXL, 2011.  Canada in Context

           http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/EJ2108101443/CIC?u=39sbo&xid=2b65b89a.
 
           Accessed 16 Mar. 2018.​
 
Franklin, Elisabeth.  “Tiger.” World Book Student, World Book, 2018,

           www.worldbookonline.com/student/article?id=ar557740. Accessed 16 Mar. 2018.

"James Watt." Science and Its Times, edited by Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer, vol. 4, Gale,

         2001. Science in Contexthttp://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/K2643411665/SCIC?

         u=39sbo&xid=ac452285. Accessed 10 Mar. 2018.

​Note: 
 ​If any of the information is missing, simply move on to           the next part. 
       
 Use the proper punctuation.
 Use the "hanging indent" when the information does not
        fit on one line.  (See last example above.)








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CLICK HERE TO SEE WHAT A PERFECT WORKS CITED PAGE LOOKS LIKE!

(To be posted soon.)


 
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